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Tennis

The history and development of tennis – the favorite sport in the UK (Part 2)

After gaining popularity with the French aristocracy, tennis began to spread throughout Europe, especially in Britain. Here too, the game was quickly adopted by the royal family, thus known as the sport of kings.

Tennis is not restricted to England and France, however, as it soon spread to Germany, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Italy, and Spain.

The development of tennis

In the 19th century, with the flourishing Victoria coming from England, the game was revived. Some notable statehouses have built-in soccer fields in their facilities along with the first appearance of the tennis club providing facilities for their members to perform.

Game enthusiasts have been trying to modify the game into an outdoor sport for a long time, eventually facilitating the introduction of vulcanized rubber. This makes it possible to produce balls soft enough not to damage the grass. But still, it retains the vibrancy and elasticity of the rubber.

One factor contributing to the game’s revival is the simplicity and ease of outdoor tennis. A flat grass surface is all that is required, and it soon becomes a popular feature for grass tennis courts. While Tennis was indeed a sport of royalty and aristocracy, in Victorian England it was the upper classes who embraced the sport in the form of playing tennis on the grass.

Tennis was indeed a sport of royalty and aristocracy

It was Arthur Balfour, an English politician who coined the term “lawn”. Soon, many other derivatives began to replace the surface of the tennis court with grass. It was eventually being replaced with concrete and clay surfaces. Soon after, the tennis lawns began to replace with a new style of play as a summer sport.

Tennis nowadays

With the rise and fall of this sport, tennis has become a subject that everyone loves it. In the long run, this tennis game will continue to grow and highly develop.

Categories
Tennis

Wimbledon as the largest tennis tournament in the UK (Part 1)

Wimbledon is one of four similar Grand Slams with the Australian Open, the French Open, and the US Open. This is the only major tournament on the pitch. Currently, legend Roger Federer is the player who holds the record 8 times of Wimbledon translation.

Time of the tournament

The tournament takes place in late June and early July lasting over 2 weeks. Worth mentioning is the focus of the most attention the women’s singles and men’s singles finals. It is held on Saturdays and Sundays in July.

Wimbledon is noted for its tradition of costumes. Besides, as well as not placing billboards around the yard. In 2009, the Wimbledon Central Stadium was fitted with a dragging dome to shield the rain and save time.

Wimbledon tournament history

Events of 1877

The first Wimbledon tennis tournament was opened on July 9, 1977. The men’s singles were the only content to be held and the winner was Spencer Gore. He is a former racket player of Harrow School, out of 22 players involved. At that time, about 200 guests paid each person a shilling to watch the final.

The courtyards are arranged in such a way that the center court is in the middle, so the main court is called the “Center Court”. The name remained the same when the club moved to its current location on Church Road in 1922 although it no longer has a central position.

The period from 1884

the tournament was supplemented with the women’s singles and men’s doubles events. Doubles and mixed doubles competitions were added in 1913. In 1922, only the final match against the best opponent in the outer ring would be played. Ever since Fred Perry won the men’s singles championship in 1936, Andy Murray was the next British in 2013 to win the title.

Meanwhile, the United Kingdom has never won a women’s singles since Virginia Wade in 1977, although Annabel Croft and Laura Robson won the women’s singles championships in 1984 and 2008 respectively.